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Authentic Faith Doesn’t Need Taxpayer ‘Help’

When I was in seminary in Wilmore, Ky., I served as a part-time missions pastor at a United Methodist church in town. The church was going through some transitions and was trying to figure out a vision for the coming months and years. The church had long been focused on caring for its own members through discipleship and preaching, but the members wanted to be more connected with the community, particularly with those who had yet to venture inside our doors.

In A Suburban Chicago School Board Race, Transgender Rights Won

A suburban Chicago school board race this spring was seen as a referendum on transgender rights. According to Tuesday’s unofficial election results, transgender rights won.

Over a year ago, the school board for Township High School District 211 in the Palatine-Schaumburg area northwest of Chicago approved a settlement with the U.S. Department of Education to allow transgender students to use the restrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender identity.

Should Religiously Affiliated Hospitals Be Allowed To Ignore A Federal Law That Protects Employee Pensions?

Today the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in a trio of cases that will decide whether religiously affiliated hospital systems must comply with federal pension protections. The large health systems don’t want to; they argue they should get a narrow exemption to the law carved out for houses of worship. But these health systems, with nearly 100,000 employees, are not churches.

Neil Gorsuch Is The Wrong Choice For A Seat On The Supreme Court

You probably haven’t read much lately about Neil Gorsuch, the federal appeals court judge President Donald J. Trump has nominated to the Supreme Court – but that’s about to change.

Gorsuch’s confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee starts on Monday. The first day will be taken up by statements from committee members and Gorsuch himself. On Tuesday, Gorsuch will start answering questions.

Thanks To Trump, A Major Transgender Rights Case Has Been Derailed At The Supreme Court

The Supreme Court this morning announced that it is remanding and vacating the lower-court decision in Gloucester County School Board v. G.G., the first transgender-rights case that the high court had ever agreed to hear.

So what does this mean, in laypeople’s terms? The Supreme Court had scheduled oral arguments for March 28. Now those arguments won’t happen this month. Instead, the case is going back to a lower federal court, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, for more deliberation.

Religious Beliefs Shouldn’t Justify Discrimination Against Schoolchildren

Gavin Grimm is the 17-year-old high-school senior at the center of the first U.S. Supreme Court case on the civil rights of transgender persons. At issue: Whether a provision in federal law known as Title IX, which forbids discrimination in public schools on the basis of sex, also protects transgender students who have been denied the equal use of school facilities based on their gender identity.

Supreme Mistake

Federal appeals court judge Neil Gorsuch doesn’t see a problem with Ten Command­ments displays on cour­t­house lawns.

Although the Decalogue springs from the Old Testament book of Exodus, which recounts how God personally handed the list to Moses, Gorsuch doesn’t consider it to be very religious.

Several of the commandments deal with how God is to be worshiped, but to Gorsuch, the commandments aren’t “just religious” and could still constitutionally be displayed to convey a “secular moral message.”

Americans United Says Religiously Affiliated Hospitals Should Comply With Federal Retirement Protections

Church-State Watchdog Files Brief With U.S. Supreme Court In Trio Of Cases Involving ERISA Pension Exemptions

Americans United for Separation of Church and State today asked the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold lower court rulings that found religiously affiliated hospitals should comply with federal pension protections.

In a friend-of-the-court brief, Americans United argued that exempting religiously affiliated hospitals and health systems from the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) would violate church-state separation by granting these institutions a financial advantage over secular competitors.

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